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 Post subject: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:25 pm 
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US landmark arrives: 1,000 Summer Olympic gold medals

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — When Simone Manuel touched the wall to clinch a gold medal Saturday night, it was a moment 120 years in the making.

The U.S. women's 4x100-meter medley relay team of Kathleen Baker, Lilly King, Dana Vollmer and Manuel — winners at the Rio Games on Saturday night — is being recognized by the U.S. Olympic Committee as delivering the nation's 1,000th gold medal in Summer Olympics history.

By their count, anyway. Keeping count of the gold total is not as exact a science as one might think.

The count accepted by the U.S. Olympic Committee coming into the Rio Games was 977 gold medals, and even that was adjusted a bit in recent weeks over a debated medal from the 1904 St. Louis Games. That means the gold medal in the women's eights on Saturday morning was the 21st for the Americans in Rio, and No. 998 overall. Some sites say there's a few more, some say a bit less. The USOC count is the accepted one.

And the relay win was No. 23 in Rio, so by the USOC's count that made it official.

"A gold medal is like a newborn baby," said long jumper Jeff Henderson, who put the U.S. on the brink with gold No. 999 earlier Saturday night. "It's just lovely."

Lovely, 1,000 times over now for the Americans.

"A remarkable achievement made possible by the culture of sport that is the fabric and foundation of Team USA," USOC CEO Scott Blackmun said Saturday night.

James Connolly won the first for the U.S. in 1896, and of course no one has added more to the total than Michael Phelps, a 23-time gold medalist. Illustrating how not-so-simple this medal-counting business is, the official info portal for the Rio Games even has a different number than the USOC, saying the one the Americans will recognize as No. 1,000 is really No. 1,001.

Whatever the real number, the U.S. is the first to reach four figures — in a landslide. The Soviet Union remains No. 2 on the all-time summer gold list, and no other nation has even reached 500.

"Here's the significance: The next four best nations had 1,004 gold medals coming into Rio," said Bill Mallon, an Olympic historian. "You add up the next four and they barely have more than we do."

At its current rate, China wouldn't reach 1,000 golds until 2100. Germany wouldn't get there until 2204.

But there have been some very interesting story lines on the U.S. road to 1,000. Consider some of them:

THE DEMONT CASE

If Rick DeMont had his way, gold medal No. 1,000 would really be identified as gold medal No. 1,001.

Or maybe even No. 1,002.

DeMont was 16 when he won gold in the 400-meter freestyle at the Munich Games in 1972. But he tested positive for ephedrine, which was part of his asthma medication, and stripped of the medal days later along with a chance to compete in a 1,500-meter event.

His saga, however, doesn't stop there.

DeMont tried for decades to get the medal back, saying he was wronged because the USOC did not properly disclose to Olympic officials that he was on medication — and that if they had done so, his ephedrine level would not have led to his ban. In 2001, the USOC recognized DeMont for his achievements and said it was bringing him "back into the Olympic family."

But the International Olympic Committee — in part out of concern for setting a precedent that could lead to enormous numbers of athletes contesting results — declined later that year to consider restoring DeMont's gold over the USOC paperwork mix-up. So the gold remains awarded to Bradford Cooper of Australia. Cooper now owns a swimming school in his homeland while DeMont is the swimming coach at Arizona.

"It was so long ago that it almost seems like it happened to another person in another life," DeMont said Saturday. "I don't carry it with me."

THE ST. LOUIS GAMES

No matter how well the U.S. does in these Rio Games, the medal count this year won't come close to the St. Louis Games in 1904.

Officially, here's the count from that Olympics for the U.S.: 79 golds (it had been 78 until recently, when one medal that was counted as being won by a mixed-nationality team was added to the U.S. total because five of the six members were Americans, along with one Austrian), 78 silver and 79 bronze — 236 medals in all.

Germany was second in the medals standings, with 13.

"There is no wrong or right," Mallon said. "It's an interpretation."

The Olympic website describes those St. Louis Games as being "lost in chaos." They lasted nearly five months, had a marathoner disqualified for using a car on the route, saw gymnast George Eyser win six medals despite having a wooden leg and featured events such as dumbbells and tug-of-war.

About half the official competitions in those games had only American entrants, and some historians have suggested that even some of the athletes who are listed as part of the U.S. team likely were newly arrived immigrants who either hadn't become citizens yet or never actually completed that process.

THE 1906 GAMES

You might not know about them, since they don't count.

Held in Athens, Greece, they were considered an Olympics at the time — though aren't now recognized by the IOC, so the medal counts appear in no official lists. Though unlike the St. Louis Games two years earlier, this had more of a normal Olympic program.

There were 78 events and medals were awarded; there even was a true opening ceremony. The U.S. was second to France in the medal standings, winning 12 golds to their 15.

So while little debates and differing counts will likely continue, the U.S. dominance isn't in question. And maybe it was fitting that Phelps, the most decorated Olympian ever with 28 medals helped start the march toward the next milestone Saturday night, when the final swim of his career — part of a win in a relay — delivered gold No. 1,001.

"It's the Olympics," said U.S. swimmer Katie Ledecky, a five-time winner of Olympic gold. "It's the pinnacle of our sport ... and we feed off of each other."

Pretty darn impressive


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:30 pm 
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Michael Phelps ends record-breaking career with 23rd Olympic gold medal

Even Michael Phelps couldn’t imagine an ending this good.

In his final race before retirement, the most decorated Olympian in history led the U.S. to victory in the 400-meter medley relay at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on Saturday.

Phelps finished a career that spanned five Olympics with 28 medals, 23 of them gold. No other athlete in any sport has more than nine gold medals.

Ryan Murphy (backstroke), Cody Miller (breaststroke) and Nathan Adrian (freestyle) joined Phelps on the relay that finished in 3 minutes 27.95 seconds. Phelps dove into the pool on the third leg as the U.S. tailed by .61 seconds. He touched the wall after his 100 meters of butterfly with the relay ahead by almost a half-second.

Phelps retired following the London Olympics -- disappointed with his performance and tired of the sport -- but returned 18 months later in search of a better ending to more than two decades in the pool.

The comeback produced more success than the 31-year-old expected. Phelps captured five gold medals and one silver at these Games, including his fourth consecutive Olympic gold in the 200-meter individual medley and another gold in the 200-meter butterfly.

Phelps looked like the same dominant swimmer who holds three individual world records and revolutionized the sport, only more at ease, comfortable with himself and able to enjoy the moment. At times during the last week, Phelps shook his head in disbelief at the stream of victories. He repeatedly laughed, kissed his son, Boomer, after races and shed tears during some medal ceremonies.

Phelps is more aware of his place in history, too. His feats in the pool inspired a generation of young swimmers. Some of his teammates on this edition of the U.S. Olympic swimming team grew up seeking his autograph or decorated their bedroom walls with his picture. Katie Ledecky, the 19-year-old sensation who won four gold medals at these Games, posed for a photograph with Phelps and got his autograph when she was 9.

The success in Rio de Janeiro fueled speculation that Phelps would relent on retirement once again and return for the Tokyo Olympics in four years. Ryan Lochte, his longtime rival and friend, repeatedly predicted during the past week. Phelps’ mother, Debbie, and fiancee, Nicole Johnson, both floated the possibility, too.

But Phelps has remained adamant that his days in the pool are finished.

“This is over. This is it. Tonight’s the last one,” Phelps said earlier Saturday during a Facebook Live broadcast.


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:30 pm 
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Biles, Raisman Finish Storybook Olympics With Gold And Silver In Floor Exercise Final

RIO DE JANEIRO – Simone Biles and Aly Raisman stood in a hallway speaking to throngs of media around them when Raisman let out a shout: “Simone! Danell is going!”

“Danell” was Danell Levya, and “going” meant their U.S. teammate Leyva was up on the high bar for the men’s individual final in the event, the last artistic gymnastics competition during these Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

So there they stood, side-by-side, the best female gymnasts in the world watching one of their compatriots and friends go for his second medal in as many finals that day.

Standing and watching: It was what most of us had done the past 10 days as Biles and Raisman had performed in front of millions and become American darlings – Biles for a first time, Raisman again, four years after three medals, including team gold with the Fierce Five.

But they were the “Final Two,” as women’s national team coordinator Martha Karolyi had called them after their floor routine final Tuesday afternoon, in which – and no shock here – Biles won gold and Raisman captured the silver.

So as they stood and watched Leyva, the media stood and watched them watch, too. They have commanded our attention as the two best gymnasts in the world this Olympic Games. Of course we would wait for them a few seconds longer. How could we not?

“We’ve waited for this moment for so long, and then today walking to breakfast we were like, ‘Wow, today is the last day,’” Biles said of the Olympic waiting game, now over – completely, suddenly. “I think we were so excited to do good floor routines.”

Great more than good, actually. Biles flew to a 15.966 while Raisman hit a 15.500, the U.S. going 1-2 on the floor for the first time ever in that event. Biles walks away from Rio with four gold medals, more than any American gymnast – man or woman – has won at one Games, while she, Raisman and their Final Five teammates proved that they were far and away the best women’s gymnastics team in the world.

The numbers are mind-boggling: The nine medals overall for the women’s team is an Olympic record for the U.S. Meanwhile, Biles’ four golds in one Games ties her with three other women in history, and Raisman becomes the first American to medal on floor at back-to-back Games, having won gold in 2012. With her team gold, all-around silver and floor silver in Rio, Raisman is now the second-most-decorated U.S. Olympic gymnast, one medal shy of Shannon Miller. And Gabby Douglas, the reigning Olympic all-around champion, also made history, becoming the first to return to the Games since the great – Ms. Perfect 10 herself – Nadia Comaneci in 1980.

“It’s been a long journey, and this was the last event at the Olympics,” said Biles’ coach, Aimee Boorman, fighting back tears. “You work so hard for so long. … It feels fulfilling. That’s the word I would use, ‘fulfilling.’”

It was fulfilling to watch the women again on Tuesday, Raisman saying she feels like a better gymnast now than she was four years ago in London and – wait for it – not ruling out a return to the Olympics in 2020. She’d be 26 in Tokyo.

“I said I get better with age, so maybe I will,” Raisman said laughing. Then, she turned serious: “It’s obviously very hard to get to the point and it’s not always fun getting back into this crazy shape that we’re in right now, but I love gymnastics and I love competing and I think surpassed my expectations and everyone else’s. I’m on a high right now. I’ll take a break and come back to the gym and see how it goes.”

Biles, too, is unsure if this is the end of the road for her. Both will go out on tour this fall before fully re-evaluating.

“We had a phenomenal experience,” she said. “I need to take a little break, have some fun and just not think of it. I’m going to have a break and then I’ll think about it.”

The nine women’s medal and three from the men make this the most successful gymnastics effort – 12 total – at an Olympics since Team USA won 16 in Los Angeles in 1984.

Biles did not win what many had expected her to: Five golds in five events. A bobble on the balance beam left her in third, while teammate Laurie Hernandez won the silver. Five golds was an expectation that she had not had of herself, however, and Boorman made it clear that she and Biles see the Games as an astounding success.

“I’ve always told her, ‘Other people’s expectations are not your responsibility,’” Boorman said firmly. “The thing with the bronze medal yesterday, she was very proud. She won a bronze medal on the balance beam at the Olympics. How many people get to do that? She told the media, ‘That was your goal for me to have a gold medal on it. My goal was to have to do my best performance and hopefully end up on the podium.’”

But should Biles decide not to return to competition – she’s 19 and would be 23 in 2020 – this was her last Olympics, even if she does compete domestically or internationally for a bit henceforth. Boorman, her coach of over 10 years, is acutely aware of that.

She has thought about Biles not coming back for another Olympics, she said, fighting back tears as she was asked about it. How does that feel?

“It’s like sending your kid off to college,” she explained. “You know you’re going to see them, but you just don’t know what their life is going to be but you’re excited for what they’re going to go out and experience. That’s where I am right now. It’s a journey. This is a milestone.”

A milestone that puts Biles in the history books – for a long time.

“It’s pretty insane what I’ve accomplished in my first Olympics,” Biles said reasonably, her eyes surrounded by glitter, another Olympic gold hanging around her neck. “It’s definitely rewarding. I’m very proud of myself. It’s crazy.”

Raisman agreed.

“She’s crazy. I can’t believe she has four Olympic gold medals,” she said. “It’s amazing; it’s hard to put into words. I don’t even consider myself competing against her because she’s at another level. I’m in awe watching her even though I train with her every day.”

Now what?

“There’s probably going to be some pizza involved,” Boorman laughed of a celebratory plan.

Biles and Raisman said they are planning a team watch party of their all-around final, as the Americans had yet to see it for themselves. It’s one of the many sparkling moments for Team USA, which also included Madison Kocian’s silver medal on the uneven bars.

Biles, who had Olympic-sized expectations looming over her ever since the first of three all-around world titles that she won three years ago suddenly couldn’t believe it was all finished.

“There is some sense of relief because you keep pushing and keep going until it’s over,” she said, having gotten teary-eyed on the medal podium Tuesday as the national anthem played.

“But, I’m sad that I’m done, too.”


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:32 pm 
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When did track and field turn into diving?

Attachment:
dive at the line.JPG


Shaunae Miller Dives to Gold in 400 Meters

In a desperate lunge at the finish line, Shaunae Miller of the Bahamas won the women’s 400 meters at the Rio Olympics on Monday night, defeating Allyson Felix of the United States.

Running in Lane 7 and leading down the stretch, Miller apparently could sense that Felix was closing fast on the inside. With four strides remaining, Miller began to dive toward the finish line like a runner trying to steal second base.

The maneuver actually may have slightly slowed Miller, 22, as she began to put less force into the ground to propel herself forward. Still, Miller’s torso crossed first, as required by the rules, and she took the gold medal in 49.44 seconds, her personal best.

Miller remained on the track on her back until she was declared the winner in a photo finish. Felix, seeking to become the first woman to win five Olympic gold medals in track and field, took second in 49.51.

The result was disappointing for Felix, who had hoped to win gold medals at 200 and 400 meters. She did not qualify for the Olympic 200. She still has a chance to win a gold medal in the 4x400 relay, which is scheduled to begin Friday.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The rules state only that the win is determined by which athlete has any part of her torso cross the line first. Miller could have come across the line in mid-air ... or on her hands and knees ... as long as the torso crossed first.

The photo finish showed the negative image of Miller’s sprawled out body, with her shoulder just barely over the line before Felix reached. A track timer studying the finish would note that .07, while very close, isn't that close.

Miller's dive certainly isn't the textbook approach. Coaches teach athletes to do just what Felix did: Run through the line, dipping shoulders and torso forward as you get there.

It wasn't a strategic move by Miller, but more one borne of desperation and drive.

“I don’t know what happened. My mind just went blank,” Miller said. “The only thing I was thinking (about) was the gold medal, and the next thing I know, I was on the ground.”


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:37 pm 
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Uncle Sam is happy for you winning gold.

Uncle Sam goes for gold, too: Up to $9,900 per Olympic gold medal

Michael Phelps swims fast, but not fast enough to beat Uncle Sam, who awaits him at the finish line each time he wins a medal. His total income tax bill for the 2016 Games? Up to about $55,000 for his five golds and one silver.

Olympic athletes who bring home medals also bring home cash — $25,000 for gold, $15,000 for silver and $10,000 for bronze — paid for by the United States Olympic Committee. Like any prize winner, from a jackpot hitter to a Nobel Prize recipient, the athletes are taxed because Olympic medals and cash bonuses are considered income, said Steven Gill, associate professor of accounting at San Diego State University.

The maximum possible "victory tax" on the bonus for each gold medal, using the top tax rate of 39.6% for the nation's highest earners, is $9,900, according to Americans for Tax Reform. For silver, it's $5,940, and for bronze it's $3,960. Athletes in lower tax brackets would owe less — and keep in mind that some or all of their massive training expenses would likely be deductible, whether they treat their sport as a business or a hobby.

The medals themselves are taxed, too, but they're not as valuable as their shiny goodness may appear. Based on the commodity prices of the metals involved, gold is worth in the neighborhood of $600, silver about $300 and bronze next to nothing. What they'd go for on the open market is much higher, easily $10,000 or more, but that's not a factor unless an athlete sells or otherwise disposes of the medal, according to tax expert Blake Christian, partner at Holthouse Carlin & Van Trigt.

Congress has tried to give Olympic athletes a tax break. In 2012, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., introduced a bill to shield medals and bonuses from Uncle Sam, but it died. “We can all agree that these Olympians who dedicate their lives to athletic excellence should not be punished when they achieve it,” Rubio said in a statement then.

This year, Sens. John Thune, R-S.D., and Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., sponsored a similar bill to eliminate taxes on Olympic and Paralympic athletes. The bill passed the Senate in July. “Our Olympian and Paralympic athletes should be worried about breaking world records, not breaking the bank, when they earn a medal,” Schumer said in a statement last week.

As for Phelps and his maximum Olympic tax bill of $55,440, don't worry. He probably won't have a hard time paying up. His net worth is about $55 million, according to Celebrity Net Worth.


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:41 pm 
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A fall in the 5,000 delivers an uplifting moment

RIO DE JANEIRO — Perhaps the most moving parcel of time that these Games will see happened at Olympic Stadium on Tuesday morning, in the heats of the women’s 5,000 meters.

It was a moment that forged a friendship between two athletes who had never previously met, an accident that preceded an extraordinary gesture to warm the hearts of a global audience and spoke to everything that is good and righteous about international sports’ grandest competition.

Nikki Hamblin of New Zealand and Abbey D’Agostino of the USA didn’t know each other and had never spoken before they stepped onto the track, both seeking a place in the final amid stiff competition.

With 4½ of the 12½ laps remaining, confusion struck. D’Agostino fell while running amid a pack of athletes, causing her to clip Hamblin, just ahead of her. The pair tumbled spectacularly. It was an ugly, disappointing mess.

Until something beautiful and uplifting, literally, happened.

“When I went down I was like ‘Why am I on the ground’ and suddenly there was this hand on my shoulder,” Hamblin said.

It was D’Agostino, who had stopped, and was lifting her rival to her feet. “Come on, get up,” the American was saying. “We have to finish this race.”

The problem was, that D’Agostino’s knee had been battered in the fall. It was badly damaged and looked out of place. As she helped Hamblin it buckled beneath her. The New Zealander then returned the favor, lending physical support, and waiting until D’Agostino was able to move under her own speed that she carried on. The pair continued.

Hamblin finished in 16:43:61, D’Agostino 17:10:02. Both times, understandably, were way outside their personal bests. They didn’t matter. It could have taken an hour for them to finish and they would still have triumphed as emphatically as any gold medal winner.

This is how sports should be. Competition is important and entertaining but humanity is more so. Abbey D’Agostino knows. So too does Nikki Hamblin.

“I am so grateful to Abbey for doing that for me,” Hamblin said. “That girl is the Olympic spirit right there. I am so impressed and inspired.

“I had never met her, isn’t that so amazing? It is a moment that I will never ever forget for the rest of my life.”

As they were not at fault for the fall, both Hamblin and D’Agostino were advanced through the final. D’Agostino immediately received medical treatment after the race and it is not clear if she will even be able to run. Hamblin will be a huge long shot for a medal. Again, it doesn’t matter.

This will resonate more than anything else they could have done, or could do now, more so than if they pulled off a miraculous upset by breaking the tape tied for first in a new world record time.

Tuesday morning's moment prompted an outpouring of support and attention around the world. Journalists from eight nations were in the pack who interviewed Hamblin after the race. D’Agostino was in the medical tent, receiving treatment, when she got the message she had been put into the final.

Maybe D’Agostino got swept up in the Olympic spirit. Maybe she was just so happy to be here that she did a remarkable deed — she only placed fifth at trials but got a spot when two other athletes pulled out of the event. Or maybe, as Hamblin said, she is just “such a good person.”

“Everyone wants to win and get a medal, but as disappointing as it is, there is so much more to this,” Hamblin said. “It is just a mutual understanding of how much everyone puts into it. For sure (we have) a friendship now. When someone asks me what happened in Rio in 20 years time, that is my story. She is my story.”


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:44 pm 
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Usain Bolt says he will go hard after world record in 200

RIO DE JANEIRO — Usain Bolt vowed to go all out to smash his world record in the 200 meters and sign off his individual Olympic career in style.

The Jamaican star comfortably won his heat on Tuesday in a time of 20.28 seconds and insisted he can and will go much faster in the final on Thursday.

“I will definitely have enough rest and energy to try,” Bolt said, when asked if he could best his own world mark of 19.19. “I have two days, I have long days now to rest. Tomorrow I will show much better progress, I have to run faster. It is a championship.”

Bolt has previously spoken of his wish to become the first man to go under 19 seconds and potentially ensure the 200 record is not broken for decades.

Bolt's preliminary time was 15th among competitors, but as usual he shut it down early. He was encouraged by his smooth passage through the heats and admitted that coach Glen Mills was saving any tweaks to his technique or detailed game plan until before the final.

“The execution I think was OK,” Bolt added. “The key thing was I qualified and I qualified easy so that was good. (Mills) never really talks that much about the 200, he knows I know to run the 200 very well. Maybe for the finals he will give me some instruction so I just do what I have to do.

“I am feeling a little bit tired, but that is to be expected. It is the morning session, and I am not really a morning person. I came out there to qualify and that’s what I did.”

Conditions at Olympic Stadium were sweltering, and it showed, but Bolt said the experience had only boosted his confidence further following his victory in the 100. His mood was further improved by the new schedule for the 200 at these Olympics: Tuesday morning’s heats followed by semifinals Wednesday, and the final the following night.

“I am surprised because normally we have to do two rounds in one day so I think it is actually better for the 200 that we get to recover for another day.

“For me I notice that a lot of the other guys always seem to run fast in the heats. For me it is a key thing to win because you get a better lane for the semifinal.

“I didn’t really run that hard.”

Not running hard? Just feeling OK, and still running a 20.28 where he started to slow down way before the finish? With the way he ran and spoke, Bolt showed why he is the man to beat in his favorite event.


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2016 6:47 pm 
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As of this afternoon the medal count for the U-S-A stands at....
Attachment:
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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 2:31 pm 
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Ok, it may sound like bragging, but..... Sorry not sorry gotta brag on my state. /hehehe

If Texas was its own country - which, let's be honest, to many of us, it is - it would rank eighth in the 2016 Olympics medal count with 42 total medals.

That means the Lone Star State by itself has more medals than all of Canada (22). Countries like Australia (29), Italy (28) and Spain (17) don't want to get into any kind of medal-counting contest with Texas, either. Oh, and host country Brazil (19)? Thanks for all your medals.

As for Golds?

2016 Olympic Medal Count, Ranked by Number of Gold Medals.

1. United States: 46 gold, 37 silver, 38 bronze, 121 total

2. Great Britain: 27 gold, 23 silver, 17 bronze, 67 total

3. Texas: 26 gold, 6 silver, 10 bronze, 42 total

4. China: 26 gold, 18, silver, 26 bronze, 70 total

5. Russia: 19 gold, 18 silver, 19 bronze, 56 total

6. Germany: 17 gold, 10 silver, 15 bronze, 42 total

7. Japan: 12 gold, 8 silver, 21 bronze, 41 total

8. France: 10 gold, 18 silver, 14 bronze, 42 total

9. South Korea: 9 gold, 3 silver, 9 bronze, 21 total

10. Italy: 8 gold, 12 silver, 8 bronze, 28 total

The University of Texas had a nice medal haul as well with nine golds, a silver and two bronzes. Longhorns grabbed five gold medals in swimming and three more in track and field.

Of course, if we took away all the United States' medals that were won by Texans, then Texas would pass the U.S. as well. But, then again, we're giving Texas credit for three gold medals for winning the men's basketball championship and two for winning the women's basketball title. Whatever, nerds. Texas Forever.

With the likes of Simone Biles, Simone Manuel, Kerron Clement, DeAndre Jordan, Jimmy Butler, Brittney Griner and Sarah Robles all hailing from Houston, a lot of countries wouldn't want to deal with H-Town's medal count of 10 golds, two silvers and two bronzes.

How did other Texas schools (other than UT listed above) fare?
SMU: Eight Mustangs headed to Rio, though only Wylie's Jackie Galloway was competing for the U.S. Galloway took home bronze in her taekwondo class, while Lovisa Lindh made it to the 800m semifinal for Sweden. Six Mustangs swam, highlighted by Rachel Nicol's fifth-place 100m breaststroke finish.
Baylor: Brittney Griner continued dominating women's basketball bringing home gold. Trayvon Bromell slotted eighth in the 100m race and was disqualified in the 4x100m relay.
TCU: Sarah Scherer finished eighth in 10m air rifle shooting, while Lorraine Ugen placed 11th in the long jump.
Texas Tech: Janine Beckie led Canada women's soccer to a bronze medal, while Victoria Esson represented New Zealand on the pitch. Gil Roberts ran for the U.S.'s gold-medal 4x400m relay, but Bradley Adkins didn't advance from the high-jump qualification round.
UTEP: Golfer Gerina Piller finished tied for 11th, Blessing Okagbare ran in the 200m semifinals and Tobi Amusan jumped through the 100m hurdle semifinals. Churandy Martina finished fifth in Usain Bolt's 200m race.
Texas State: Logan Cunningham and Anicka Newell competed in pole vault, neither advancing past qualification round.
North Texas: Golfer Rodolfo Cazaubon finished in a tie for 30th place.

Sources:
http://www.chron.com/olympics/article/W ... 176024.php
http://www.esquire.com/sports/news/a478 ... n-country/
http://sportsday.dallasnews.com/college ... rformances
http://www.esquire.com/sports/news/a478 ... n-country/


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 Post subject: Re: 2016 Rio Olympics
PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2016 2:41 pm 
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Location: Texas
However, to be fair as of last Friday here is where the medal count stood by state (of course this article is based on different criteria - where the athlete was born vs. where they live - Simone Biles is credited to Ohio in this article since she was born there, but lives in Houston) Regardless the US has much to be proud of this Olympics. Ryan Lochte not withstanding /facepalm

As of Friday morning, California tops the list with a whopping 26 medals.

The aptly named Golden State owes a lot of that Olympic bling to the U.S. swim team. Maya DiRado, Anthony Ervin and Missy Franklin all won gold.

Lady Liberty in New York is probably proudly holding that torch high because her state has the second-most medals so far, with 13.

Archery's Jake Kaminski and fencer Monica Aksamit both contributed to the Empire State's medal count.

Maryland can credit six of its nine total medals to the "Baltimore Bullet," aka Michael Phelps.

Besides being the birthplace of the most decorated Olympian of all time, Maryland is also where wrestling star Helen Maroulis was born. In Rio, she won Team USA's first ever gold in women's wrestling.

Illinois also snagged nine total Olympic medals.

The majority of those came from the state's aquatically adept athletes. Backstroke specialist Ryan Murphy contributed three gold medals to his home state's haul.

Also with nine medals overall is Texas.

Swimmer Simone Manuel, who was born in Sugar Land, became the first African American woman to win gold in an individual Olympic swimming event. She won four medals in all.

Finally, we're highlighting Ohio as an honorable mention.

Five of Ohio's eight medals belong to gymnast Simone Biles, who earned four golds and a bronze during her amazing string of performances in Rio.

In total, athletes from 34 states and Washington, D.C., have earned medals at this year's Olympics.

Source: http://www.statesman.com/news/news/nati ... rio/nsJNQ/


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